Topic: Will documenting ringcodes ever be a requirement before adding games?

There are simply way too many PS1 games which have absolutely nothing except IFPI xxxx and a yellow marker http://redump.org/images/status/yellow.png next to it. It would be nice if we didn't have to keep buying already dumped games just to verify them and actually document what someone else couldn't be bothered doing. It really isn't that hard to shine a light on the back of a disc and read out the numbers.

Re: Will documenting ringcodes ever be a requirement before adding games?

The recent ps1 dumpers (user7, DangerBoy, wiggy2k, etc.) all say they either don't have the equipment for it, or that the ringcodes were illegible when they tried. Would be nice to see some more effort put into this, as the complete ringcodes could help uncover any potentially missing versions.

Re: Will documenting ringcodes ever be a requirement before adding games?

All they need is a flashlight to be able to read them. Yes, getting photos or scans of them is slightly more difficult but in most cases just double checking the ringcodes is good enough, most people can be trusted that what they have typed will be identical to what's on the disc.

Oh look, a cheap and nasty 640x480 webcam from the 2000s. I can see Sony DADC, IFPI L555, A0100314437-0101   15 and an A1 toolstamp without having to make a huge setup using a massive scanner and a grow lamp. The only thing that didn't come out in the screen capture was the IFPI 944S stamped on the disc. Game is Brunswick Circuit Pro Bowling 2 (PAL). I cannot dump it because it requires a Plextor, which is impossible to get in Australia and ridiculously expensive to import (over A$100 including shipping), even for ancient drives from the 1990s. There is only one pressing of this disc which will only ever be #314437 in the DADC part number list. The toolstamps and moulded SID codes change between batches (depending on the machine which manufactured the disc) but the master will always be the same.

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Re: Will documenting ringcodes ever be a requirement before adding games?

Heihachi_73 wrote:

I cannot dump it because it requires a Plextor, which is impossible to get in Australia and ridiculously expensive to import (over A$100 including shipping), even for ancient drives from the 1990s.

Technically, you either need something with the combined offset (disc+drive) positive (so, the drive's offset needs to be >+647) or something swappable, so you could swap some audio cd with the data disc and dump everything in audio mode (plextors are only preferable due to 0xd8 command, which allows not to swap with audio cds for reading data sectors as audio).

Heihachi_73 wrote:

There is only one pressing of this disc which will only ever be #314437 in the DADC part number list.

Is it a public list?

Re: Will documenting ringcodes ever be a requirement before adding games?

IMO ring codes are not essential and many would not be dumping if they were required. Ditto with two rare PSX dumpers I'm bringing on board redump, dumping games you will never see again because no other known copies exist among collectors. Not everyone feels comfortable blasting their discs with a hot flashlight when there is only a handful of copies or 1 copy known to exist. Rings, barcodes, great to have, even better having the disc in the database instead of not at all.

I just sent a Plextor to Europe, yes shipping is expensive but you only have to do it once then you can resell if you choose after dumping all the discs you wanted to. Someone from Redump will help you find a drive if you're looking for it cheap and intend to dump more than a couple games.

Re: Will documenting ringcodes ever be a requirement before adding games?

Ring codes are more useful than the SLUS/SLES etc. numbers actually. Some games have the exact same PlayStation ID number between versions while the matrix is completely different due to being a different pressing. The SID codes and toolstamps are fairly unimportant however as these change during the manufacturing process.

@ F1ReB4LL: I am not sure if there is a public list of every single disc made by Sony. The Sony DADC part numbers are on most "PAL region" Sony-made discs regardless of what optical media it is e.g. games, data, audio, movie DVDs, UMDs, Blu-Ray, they are simply done sequentially on what happens to be the next disc to be stamped, with no preference to what format the disc is. Note that some European/Australian Sony discs were instead stamped with the "NTSC" style IDs instead, these are not part of the same list. DADC discs made before circa 1994 are also in a different numbering format and these don't count either. I do not know what the A00/A01 at the start signifies (older DVDs and PS1 launch titles like Tekken 1 don't have the A01 but most other PS1 games do) but it isn't part of the serial number.

7 (edited by Lizard 2017-10-12 11:27:38)

Re: Will documenting ringcodes ever be a requirement before adding games?

I'm still waiting to receive my Plextor drive to dump games, but at least after reading this thread i have tried to get barcodes from my games.
First attempt with my copy of Gran Turismo 2 PAL Disc 2 SCES-12380
Setup with a lamp light and a Samsung scanner.
Image codes are barely readable but i guess it's sufficient.
Codes are different from the one that i can see on http://redump.org/disc/83/
DADC IFPI L555 A0100306121-0202 15 B3
Stamped on disc but unreadable in photo: IFPI 947R
If for you it's good, that's obviously just an example, i can do that for all the other games i have.

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